Designer Spotlight… by Elias

Meet Bevin Elias of by Elias, the Brooklyn, New York based design firm whose floral display and design work we’ve been admiring for some time, and are now thrilled to share.

Bevin Elias
Bevin Elias

Jamali Garden: Tell us about your background.
by Elias Design: I was born in Grenada and made my home in Brooklyn. I worked as a member of the fashion community for companies such as Tommy Hilfiger, Club Monaco, Armani, Cartier, and Brioni, performing duties in the Visual and Creative Departments. During my time at Cartier, I had the opportunity to expand on my day to day product presentation tasks by incorporating floral design into our visual presentations, boutique layouts, and events. It was there that I got the chances to learn and work beside power house designers and colleagues with impressive resumes filled with design and floral wonders.

A table at Brooklyn  Circus with proteas, thistle, Queens Anne's lace, and greenery in black urns.
A table at Brooklyn Circus with proteas, thistle, Queens Anne’s lace, and seasonal fall greenery in black urns.

JG: When did you start by Elias Design?
bED: I founded by Elias Design in 2013. We provide sophisticated, yet impactful, visual presentation to serve as the finishing touches for our clients across the globe. At by Elias we aim to present the most unique and eye catching designs that motivate and evoke positive emotion while impacting all five senses. This dedication, coupled with a diligent attention to our clients’ satisfaction, is our modus operandi.

Antique hydrangea, South African King Protea, and red roses.
Antique hydrangea, South African King Protea, and red roses.

JG: How would you describe your floral & decor style?
bED: My design execution is based on the defining principle to motivate others. “Motivation through great Design” is what I preach to all. I love to build and group monochromatic elements, floral, and everyday objects, to create a lasting moment guests can take away.

A ceremony aisle with groups of floating candles in three vessels: two glass cylinder vases and a ball votive holder.
A ceremony aisle with groups of floating candles in three vessels: two glass cylinder vases and a ball votive holder.

JG: We observed this and love how you mix and layer all things similar, and the very unexpected. Tell us a little why and how you make it come together.
bED: Many things look great by themselves, but grouped, especially in odd numbers, they create impact and become interactive. I always lean towards triangular groupings of design elements and play on height when given the opportunity.

Hydrangeas and succulents mix with driftwood and river stones.
Hydrangeas and succulents mix with driftwood and river stones.

JG: This is a great example of that, as if all the pieces are in a delicate balance.
bED: This was for a Spring/Summer 2014 Brioni Press Day Presentation. Cement trays held black river stones with driftwood, dotted with succulents, while a glass vase with hydrangeas rounded out this set up.

This table centerpiece includes driftwood and succulents.
A wedding centerpiece that also includes driftwood and succulents.
The white and green floral centerpiece.
The white and green floral centerpiece.

JG: White and green always gets us.
bED: This table was from an August wedding. I do more private dinners, and corporate events than weddings, but would love to explore the wedding market more. The arrangement’s in a brass urn and has white hydrangeas, snapdragons, ranunculus, freesia, Tibet roses, Silver Dollar & spiral eucalyptus.

An an arrangement high above in New York City.
An an arrangement high above in New York City.
From the top: an arrangement set in a mirror tray.
From the top: an arrangement set in a mirror tray.

JG: We loved this arrangement, and still do, and featured it in our ‘GET INTO PLATINUM’ blog post. Where was this?
bED: This was on a private Fifth Avenue rooftop. The arrangement of dahlias, astilbe, amaranthus, White Owl King Protea, spiral eucalyptus, and chestnut pods, was in a platinum catora bowl surrounded by a cut succulent, ghost-wood, and a few silver mercury glass votives.

A terra-cotta tray with succulents.
A terracotta tray with succulents.

JG: We spotted a lot of succulents in your designs. Why do you love working with them?
bED: Succulents are my favorite plant and design element to work with. They are natural wonders in their rigidity, organic beauty, and always evoke emotion when used out of the ordinary.

JG: What are two of your favorite Jamali Garden items?
bED: I love working with the black nickel urns. They add a level of classic sophistication and serve as a great base for simple or grand floral designs. I can’t live without the tall glass cylinder vases. I use them as elevation elements, candle holders, and a modern touch of height for larger designs.

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